Dar fails on budget feedback


HakiElimu programme manager for Research and Analysis Godfrey  Boniventura speaks during a press conference in Dar es Salaam yesterday.  Right is HakiElimu programme officer charged with Analysis and Research, Mr Makumba Mwemezi.
HakiElimu programme manager for Research and Analysis Godfrey Boniventura speaks during a press conference in Dar es Salaam yesterday. Right is HakiElimu programme officer charged with Analysis and Research, Mr Makumba Mwemezi.   

Dar es Salaam. Tanzania has been listed at the bottom on a list of 30 countries in the world in releasing details and giving feedback on the financial budget to the public.

The online tool shows that Tanzania is the only country which does not give financial information to the public whereby among the eight budget documents, three documents were not made available to the public.

The report, written after a survey conducted under the Open Budget Survey Trackers (OBS) managed by the International Budget Partnership (IBP) in collaboration with HakiElimu, monitors whether the government is releasing essential information on how it raises and spends public money.

According to established international standards of transparency and accountability, eight essential budget documents should be made publicly available in a timely manner throughout the budget cycle.

Using data collected by independent civil society budget experts in the country, the OBS Tracker monitors and reports on whether central governments are publishing these documents on time.

Speaking with the journalists yesterday, acting executive director of Haki Elimu, Mr Godfrey Boniventura, said it was only five documents which were made public by the government.

“This leaves critical gaps in the public’s ability to understand how public money is being managed and at the end of the day assesses how well the government is doing in delivering essential services such as education and health,” he said.

He noted that the institution was planning to use the monthly updates provided in the Tracker to remind the government on the need to improve transparency.

Even the documents which were published, he said, were made public late after the period of the survey was over.

“These reports should be issued no later than three months after the end of the reporting period. If the report is issued after this it is not publicly available according to set standards,” he clarified.

Mid year reports (MYR) for the 2013/14 fiscal year were not produced. The reports contain a comprehensive update on the implementation of the budget as of the middle of the fiscal year, including a review of economic assumption underlying the budget and an update forecast of the budget outcome for the fiscal year.

The MYR should be available no later than one year after the end of the fiscal year.