Korea and USA in conference about nuclear


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_xi_obama_washington_976x549_getty.jpg[/IMG World of Nuclear

North Korea has been a chat during the world conference on nuclear security held in Washngton.

After meeting President Xi Jinping of China, President Barack Obama has said all obliged to make the area of ​​the Korean peninsula into a zone free non-nuclear and put more sanctions against Pyongyang.

tension mounting on the quiz of north Korea to continue nuclear weapons and tested its missile technology.
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Meles Zenawi yetigirēwi legend of King Dejazmach (Satenaw)


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Yetigirēwi “myth” of the king Dejazmach Meles Zenawi Asres kebetechewi kezēnewi, late keshumibeshi Asres, tried to be born in the small village of Adwa province thing.
Even close relatives were childhood neighbors, the son of an ugly talk about the latest šeyek’ifwachewi intertwined. Dejazmach back to the age of
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EAC leaders meet to decide on constitution of political federation


Start of final leg of integration agenda as the East African Community's five presidents meet in Nairobi to discuss constitution and governance structure. FILE PHOTOS | TEA GRAPHIC |   NATION MEDIA GROUP

Start of final leg of integration agenda as the East African Community’s five presidents meet in Nairobi to discuss constitution and governance structure. FILE PHOTOS | TEA GRAPHIC | NATION MEDIA GROUP

East Africa enters the most decisive stage in its ambitious quest for a political union this week when the five heads of state launch the writing of a federal constitution and issue a time frame for establishment of a regional government.

Political integration, which is the top agenda for the 16th Ordinary EAC Heads of State Summit scheduled for November 30 in Nairobi, would pave the way for a strong authority to reinforce implementation of the other stages of integration — the Common Market, the Monetary Union and the Customs Union.

The presidents of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda are expected to make a final decision on what form political federation will take before the draft constitution is put in place.

The presidents of South Sudan and Somalia, who have applied to join EAC, will be watching the proceedings with interest.

Among the things that the EAC presidents are expected to decide on is whether the political federation is to be under a two-tier structure with a federal entity and constituent state governments or a one-tier structure.

Under a two-tier arrangement, the federation would have a leader, with partner states sharing foreign policy, defence, currency, and economic and trade policies, even as they manage those domestic affairs that do not have a regional dimension.

The best example of a two-tier system is the Union between Tanganyika and Zanzibar, which formed the United Republic of Tanzania. While Zanzibar has its own elected government, it has to operate under the Union government in terms of foreign policy and international relations.

A one-tier system would see all member countries come under one president, with uniform policies and all citizens to be involved in the election of the federal president.

During their last summit in Kampala last year, the EAC heads of state directed partner states to hold consultations and agree on the final draft of the roadmap before it is presented to the Summit this year for approval.

READ: Rules on governing EAC federation set

2016 deadline

Early this year, EAC ministers were directed to initiate the process of drafting a constitution for the political federation ahead of the 2016 deadline.

A proposal by the ministers shows that the federal state will comprise an executive, legislature and judiciary, with functions based on the principle of separation of powers among the three organs. Constituent states of the federation will remain autonomous on matters that do not fall under the federal government.

The powers and functions proposed for the federal government will be informed by international practice: It will have control over defence and security, foreign affairs and international trade, immigration, infrastructure development and the federal public service, among other things.

The constituent states will be expected to implement federal laws and policies.

Letter from the future to Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, with whom it all began


Shikamoo Mwalimu Julius Nyerere. The East African Community did not die permanently in 1977; it has been resurrected and is thriving. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYAGAH |   NATION MEDIA GROUP

Shikamoo Mwalimu Julius Nyerere. The East African Community did not die permanently in 1977; it has been resurrected and is thriving. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYAGAH | NATION MEDIA GROUP     

Shikamoo Mwalimu. Next week, the Summit of Heads of State of the East African Community will take place in Nairobi, Kenya.

The Community is currently chaired by Uhuru Kenyatta, President of the Republic of Kenya. Yes sir, you may share this news with Mzee Kenyatta and Mzee Milton Obote when you see them. The East African Community did not die permanently in 1977; it has been resurrected and is thriving.

I am writing to seek your wisdom and blessings. You see, when the Summit meets, they will be deliberating, among other things, on the best way to start a constitution-making process for the Federation of East Africa! Yes, the debate is back.

You remember those many years ago, in 1963, when you offered to delay Tanganyika’s Independence to give chance to East Africa to get its Independence as a federal entity?

You feared that entrenched sovereignty and the trappings of national authority would blind us to the strategic imperatives of building a united East Africa capable of harnessing all its resources for the socio-economic development of its citizens.

You were worried that narrow parochial concerns would lead to the marginalisation of our continent. You saw clearly that Independence within the borders of colonial constructs would simply reinforce the colonial enterprise, marginally tweaking the relationship between the former colonies and the metropole, while leaving the colonial enterprise intact. Well sir, you were right.

Can you imagine that by 2005, the entire GDP of East Africa was only $40 billion — the wealth of one modern high net worth individual?

That our fragmented economies remained stuck in the mud for decades, trying to produce more cotton, coffee, and raw minerals for the consumption of the Western world?

The harder we worked, the poorer we became, until we were told that the only solution was to reduce our investments in health, education, infrastructure and energy.

We did need macroeconomic discipline, Mwalimu, but we balanced our books on the backs of the poor. We were too weak to resist, our valiant struggle against apartheid notwithstanding. We all agreed to take the medicine.

Our current leaders have decided to reverse the trend. They have decided to go back to the future. And they are succeeding. East Africa is now a Customs Union, and we are slowly turning it into a Single Customs Territory.

Beyond the free movement of goods, the region is now slowly but surely turning into a Common Market, and plans are underway to build a Monetary Union. Shared investments in infrastructure are gaining momentum. Remember when you decided to invest in the Tazara railway against all opposition?

You may be saddened to hear that line now carries less than 10 per cent of what it did in its heyday. I am glad to report however that for the first time in over 100 years, Kenya and Uganda are beginning to lay a new, modern railway line. Rwanda and Burundi are determined to follow suit. Investments in energy generation are on the rise. East Africa is determined not be a dark region, both figuratively and literally.

Do you know, Mwalimu, that since East Africa decided to deepen and widen its integration, its GDP is now over $100 billion and growing? Over 700,000 students are enrolled in 344 institutions of higher education including 161 universities.

This is a sharp rise from the 160,000 enrolled in the 1990s. They pay local fees across the region, and 2015 is the target year for turning East Africa into a Common Higher Education Area.